18December2017

Download Template for Joomla Full premium theme.

Deutschland online bookmaker http://artbetting.de/bet365/ 100% Bonus.

Online bookmaker bet365

GLOBAL ECONOMIC WEEKLY - May 8, 2017

 GLOBAL ECONOMIC WEEKLY D GROUP

8th May 2017

 

 

So, no surprise that Emmanuel Macron beat Marine Le Pen in France’s Presidential run -off yesterday – though the scale of his victory (66-34) was a surprise.  Le Pen actually came third – after abstentions and spoiled ballots.

 

 

Despite what some commentators allege, there is no sign that France’s elite (or Europe’s, for that matter) has learned from

 

Le Pen’s performance, particularly in the first round. Indeed, EU politicians – from Merkel to Tsipras - will breathe a sigh

 

of relief, and will proceed as though the “European project” is still on track. After all, the two elections that threatened EU cohesion – in France and The Netherlands – have done little or no damage, and the AfD’s leadership probl ems mean that the German election in October is almost certain to be a resounding success for Merkel.  Sure, there are enormous

problems in Europe – not least, the increasingly acrimonious row between Brussels and London over ‘Brexit’ and the continuing saga of Greece (though the latest deal should buy a few months peace and quiet, even though Syriza is most unlikely to implement the new austerity measures it has agreed). But, for the moment, at least, the European nomenklatura will feel that it has been vindicated.

 

 

Now, attention will turn to Macron’s cabinet – and, quickly thereafter, to the June 11/18 Parliamentary elections. On the first, the names being mentioned for PM include:

-    Sylvie Goulard,  a feisty euro-MP;

 

-    Xavier Bertrand, a Republicain from Northern France;

 

-    Valerie Pecresse, another Republicain, much involved in boosting Paris as a financial centre;

 

-    Jean-Yves Le Drian, currently Defence Minister (and, therefore, nominally a Socialist); and

 

 -    Francois Bayrou, who (briefly) threatened to unseat Macron’s Presidential ambitions but who subsequently

 

backed him.

 

 

 

As for Parliamentary elections, the problem is that Macron’s party, En Marche! still has no machine. Despite that, it will put up a full slate of candidates, and some polls suggest it cou ld win up to 250 seats (out of 577). Given the tribal nature of Socialist and Communist voting (and the appeal of Melenchon’s own France insoumise), that seems unlikely – and, given that Macron was notionally a Socialist Minister of Economy, he may have t rouble making inroads into the centre-right. That suggests ‘cohabitation’ – a President of one party and a Parliamentary majority of another.

 

 

As for Macron’s policies… Well, it is mostly fluff.  A deeper commitment to Europe, a common EU investment budg et

 

(whatever that means), a smaller bureaucracy (but no layoffs), a “modification” of the 35 -hour week, lower corporate taxes

 

– but no pain, for anyone. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the markets have generally shrugged off Macron’s victory – it was expected, and (more to the point) nothing  will change.

 

 

As for the US, President Trump is off on his first overseas trip this week – a wonderfully ecumenical tour that takes in the Vatican (for Catholic voters), Israel, Saudi Arabia, NATO headquarters in Brussels and a G7 Summit in Sicily. This is the kind of agenda any mainstream Republican President might follow, and it emphasises the progressive ‘normalisation’ of the Trump Administration.

 

 

The trip comes after a week in which Trump also scored a “victory”, in that the House of Representatives passed, by a narrow 217/313 majority, Paul Ryan’s (much amended) American Health Care Act – the latest attempt to “repeal and replace” Obamacare. This was, however, a very small victory – and potentially a pyrrhic one. First, the House voted before the AHCA has been properly examined or costed – which means it is little more than a work -in-progress. Second, the Senate will have its own bill – which is unlikely to look anything like Ryan’s AHCA. And, third Trump has repeated ly promised that any new healthcare  bill will offer lower cost, more choice and full coverage of pre-existing conditions – which is an almost certainly impossible trick to pull off.  It is, however, crucial for Trump’s own supporters, who are poorer and less likely to have decent health care coverage. So, real healthcare reform (and repeal of Obamacare)  is still a long way off.

 

 

In addition, as noted last week, a US government shutdown was averted at the last minute by agreement on an Omnibus

 

Spending Bill that will keep things ticking over until Sept ember 30. In that this included an extra US $15 billion for

 

 

 

defence, it can also be seen as a victory for the Administration. But it included none of the cuts to the bureaucracy that Trump had promised – and, indeed, it prompted the President to threaten that what Washington really needs is “a damn good shutdown” to force change.

 

 

Other than that, it was reported last week that Trump and Treasury Secretary Mnuchin will spend the next six weeks assessing reaction to their tax reform blueprint released ten days ago. Again, the final package will probably look very different from the initial proposal.

 

 

One interesting thing that came out last week was a list of the US companies with the biggest overseas cash piles: top of the list was Microsoft (with US $124 billion), followed by Apple (US $110 billion), Pfizer (US 86 billion), GE (US $82 billion) and IBM (US $71 billion). Getting some of this repatriated as part of any tax bill will be a top priority for Mnuchin.

 

 

As far as key appointments are concerned (an area in which the Administration is still way behind the curve), Trump’s nominee to run the SEC, Jay Clayton, has finally been confirmed.  Now, attention has shifted to the OCC – where the Comptroller, Thomas Curry, has said he is stepping down. The Administration apparently wants to appoint Joseph Otting, a former colleague of Mnuchin.  But that may take time; in the meantime, a Wall St. lawyer, Keith Noreika, is likely to be made interim Comptroller.

 

 

Brexit: Although formal negotiations for our departure from the EU are not supposed to begin until the end of this month, relations between London and Brussels have deteriorated sharply, following an acrimonious meeting between Commission President Juncker and UK PM May – details of which were leaked to a German newspaper by Juncker’s influential (and rather sinister) chief-of-staff, Martin Selmayr. Things were not improved by an FT report that (following the previous week’s EU27 Summit in Malta) the Commission’s initial negotiating positon will be that Britain must agree to pay €100 billion as an “exit fee” before any discussion of a post -“Brexit” trade agreement can take place. Some such payment is almost inevitable for commitments  already made and for pensions to British nationals working in Brussels; but this demand would (for instance) include continued payments towards the Common Agricultural Policy (ie subsidies to French and Polish farmers) in 2019/20 and beyond.  Even the Commission’s own legal services don’t seem to think Brussels has a leg to stand on.

 

 

 

Equally, Selmayr et al are now insisting that, before any substantive negotiations can take place on economic and trade issues, the UK should unilaterally grant residence right to EU-27 nationals – and should make those rights enforceable through the ECJ, which clearly breaches UK “red lines”.  All very unedifying so far.

 

 

Each side is now openly accusing the other of dirty tricks, and it is increasingly difficult to see any outcome other than a so -

 

called “hard” (or “clean”) “Brexit” – in which the UK walks away and relies on WTO rules for its trade with Europe.

 

 

 

The best hope of a more cooperative atmosphere would probably be if the Conservatives do win a resounding majority (say, over 120 seats) in the June 8 general election.  In that case, those (in Brussels and the UK) who still believe there is a chance of convincing Britons to change their minds may give up – and may, instead, try to do a deal as quickly and painlessly as possible.  Last Thursday’s local elections in the UK (which are a pointer to the general election) did indeed see a significant swing to the Tories and away from Labour, but a lot can happen between now and June. Indeed, over the weekend, a new study of voting patterns by two respected academics concluded that t he best Mrs May can realistically hope for is a majority of 60-65 – not enough to quench the hopes of those (in London and Brussels) who believe that ‘Brexit’ may still turn out to be reversible.  (One thing that is genuinely surprising is how resilient st erling has been in the face of threats from Brussels – and, indeed, from people like Goldman Sachs’s Ll oyd Blankfein, who warned last Thursday that the City of London would be marginalized by “Brexit”.)

 

 

The global economy:  Perhaps the most significant economic development of the past week was the sudden –  and unexpected  slump in oil prices, which saw front-month Brent break US $50/barrel last Thursday, pushing prices to a five-month low. Even though there has been a bounce-back,  almost all the gains from the December restraint agreement between OPEC and non-OPEC producers have now been eroded, with US gasoline futures also trading close to a six- month low.  Other than that, central banks have generally left monetary policy on hold – though (as shown by the April

PMIs) economic growth seems to be picking up.

 

 

 

In the US, Friday’s employment data (the first significant economic release for April) was significantly stronger than expected – and it is bound to have an impact on the markets, even though March’s disappointing 98,000 increase was actually revised down further, to just 79,000.

 

 

The headline increase in non-farm payrolls for the month was 211,000 – far higher than the 180,000 that had been expected. Equally, the unemployment rate, which had been e xpected to stay at 4.5%, fell to just 4.4%, while the average

 

 

 

work week edged up to 34.4 hours. True, the participation rate fell marginally, and hourly earnings were up just 2.5% year - on-year (down from 2.7%), but this was undoubtedly a strong number.

 

 

Other than the jobs data, the most significant economic releases of last week were the PMIs for April, published by the ISM and Markit.  As shown below, they were also broadly positive (any reading above 50 indicates growth), though the service sector is still more buoyant than manufacturing:

US: Purchasing Managers Indices (April)

 

 

Manufacturing

Services

ISM

54.8 (←57.2)

57.5 (←55.2)

Markit

52.8 (←52.8)

53.1 (←52.5)

 

For the rest, US data was mixed.  On the positive side, it was reported:

 

 

 

-    that personal incomes rose 0.2% in March (though spending was flat);

 

- that total vehicle sales were up 1.5% month-on-month in April (though automobile sales, a narrower category were down 4.7% year-on-year);

-    that factory orders were up 0.2% in March; and

 

-    that initial jobless claims fell sharply, by 19,000, in the latest week.

 

 

 

In addition, the trade deficit fell slightly, to US $43.7 billion, in March – significantly better than the US $44.5 billion that had been expected.

 

 

On the other hand, however, it was also reported:

 

 

 

-    that construction spending was down 0.2% in March;

 

-    that non-farm productivity fell 0.6% in the first quarter; and

 

-    that the ISM’s New York business index fell in April from 56.5 to 55.8.

 

 

 

In addition, Citi’s “surprise index” – a rather neat index which measures the gap between expected economic releases and the actual figures – is back in negative territory, after six months in which performance exceeded exp ectations.

 

 

 

So, which way would the FOMC (which met last Tuesday and Wednesday, ahead of the jobs data) jump? In the end (to no surprise), it decided to hold the Fed funds rate steady at 0.75 -1.00%. According to its subsequent policy statement, the Fed accepts that the US economy has slowed down – but it feels this is temporary and that fundamentals are solid. Friday’s payrolls data vindicates this position.  As a result, the market is now assuming that there will be another two quarter-point increases in the funds rate before year-end, with the first one likely to come as early as the next FOMC meeting on June 13 -

14.

 

 

 

As far as US markets are concerned, the corporate earnings season has been generally strong with profits up close to 15% year-on-year (though Apple’s results were disappointing).  There is concern over commodity prices in general (and oil in particular), but through the close on Friday, all the major equity indices were up – although only marginally. The DJIA, for instance, was up 1.9% for the week before last week, but closed on Friday up just 0.3% for the week, at 21,007. Same with the S&P500 (up 1.5% the previous week) and Nasdaq (up 2.3%); by the close on Friday, they were up 0.6% (at 2,399) and

0.9% (at 6,101) respectively. That may suggest US equities are close to a peak.

 

 

 

As for bonds, they have had a roller-coaster ride over the last week. The yield on the 10-year Treasury benchmark, for instance, began at 2.30%, fell to 2.29% and is currently trading around 2.35 %, having been as high as 2.36%.

 

 

Finally, as expected, Puerto Rico – a self-governing ‘Commonwealth’, rather than either a US state or a colony – took advantage on Wednesday of a Court ruling that permitted it to seek protection under Title III of the US bankruptcy code. It owes at least US $73 billion – four times more than Detroit did when it went bankrupt – and this should force creditors

to accept new terms set by an independent Oversight Board. The problem is that PR’s unique status means its eligibility for Title III is unclear.  Already, one bond insurer is suing, and the case could very well go to the Supreme Court. One way out might be for PR to apply for statehood – and there is, indeed, a plebiscite on this scheduled for June, which is backed by

the current Governor.  However, even if this passes (and, previously, Puerto Ricans have voted against statehood), there is no sign that the other 50 states want to take on such an obvious basket -case.

 

 

Turning to Europe, as noted, no one seriously expected Le Pen to win the French Presidential run-off. The only question was whether the absention rate would cut Macron’s victory margin below twenty percentage points; it didn’t.  That wa s despite a feisty performance from Le Pen – whose best campaign line was that, no matter who won on Sunday, France would be ruled by a woman: “Me or Ms Merkel”.  There were scurrilous last-minute rumours that Macron had a secret bank account in a Caribbean bolt-hole, and there will continue  to be rumours about his sexuality. But the real concerns

 

 

 

about him are (a) the absence of any substantive economic poli cies; and (b) the likelihood that, after Parliamentary elections

 

in June, he will be forced to “cohabit” with a centre -right (or hard-left) majority.

 

 

 

The other Eurozone economy that has been causing concern over the last week is, of course, Greece.

 

 

 

At the beginning of last week, PM Tsipras finally capitulated and agreed on a new deal that will permit  the next tranche of the existing €86 billion bailout package to be released in time to meet a bond repayment of €7.5 billion in July – and, almost as important, to keep the IMF on board. This deal will apparently be ratified by eurozone Finance Ministers on May 22. The mere rumour of a deal was enough to send the ASE Index up 3.1%, though there was immediate skepticism about Syriza’s willingness (or indeed ability) to do what it has promised: to reform the labour market, to make further cuts in public sector pensions and to restructure the energy market. But the deal does do one thing: it pushes the next stage of the Greek crisis (which must eventually involve writing down Greece’s total €315 billion debt) beyond the German election.

 

 

As far as the European economy is concerned, the most significant releases of last week were the (partial) PMIs for April. As shown below, almost all EU economies are now growing at a decent pace – with the unfortunate exception of Greece, where the economy  is still shrinking:

 

 

EU Purchasing Managers Indices (April)

 

 

Manufacturing

Services

Germany

58.2 (←58.2)

55.4 (←54.7)

France

55.1 (←55.1)

56.7 (←57.7)

Italy

56.2 (←55.7)

56.2 (←52.9)

Greece

48.2 (←46.7)

 

Eurozone

56.7 (←56.8)

56.4 (←56.2)

UK

57.3 (←54.2)

55.8 (←55.0)

 

It was also reported last week, at the Eurozone level:

 

 

 

-    that the unemployment rate was unchanged at 9.5% in March (though that is down from 10.2% in March

 

2016);

 

- that GDP for the zone as a whole was up 0.5% in the first quarter of 2017 – which converts to an annual growth rate of 1.7%, significantly higher than either the US or the UK; and

-    that retail sales were up 2.3% year-on-year in March, or 0.3% month-on-month.

 

 

 

 

 

Although that is positive, the eurozone PPI was down 0.3% in March, suggesting that the ECB is unlikely to tighten any further just for the moment.

 

 

That may well suit Italy in particular – where it was also reported last week:

 

 

 

- that former PM Matteo Renzi has (as expected) won back the leadership of the ruling Democratic party that he had temporarily relinquished last year; and

-    that Alitalia – the country’s flag-carrying airline – has gone into administration, pending a sale or bankruptcy

 

(though the government has provided a €600 million loan to keep it operating for another six months).

 

 

 

Politically, Ms Merkel received yet another early Christmas present over the weekend, when her CDU unexpectedly won a regional election in Schleswig-Holstein, polling 33% to just 27% for the SPD – which has ruled since 2012. Although the SPD may cling on by allying with the Greens (who got 13%) and the FDP (who got a respectable 11%), this was a big personal victory for Merkel – and a further blow to Martin Schulz, whose bubble seems to have burst.

 

 

As for here in the UK, Thursday’s local elections do strongly suggest that the June 8 general election will result in a hefty victory for the Conservatives – as well as a catastrophic defeat for Labour, a ho-hum result for the LibDems and virtual annihilation for UKIP (which is seen as irrelevant now that the Tories are negotiating the UK’s exit).  Maybe; however, in my opinion, the Conservatives remain vulnerable on several counts, in particular:

 

 

-    the ‘stickiness’ of the Labour vote in Northern England;

 

-    the Tories’ refusal to rule out tax rises or rises in National Insurance during the next Parliament;

 

- their plans to penalise users of heavily-polluting diesel vehicles (who were encouraged to buy diesel engines over gasoline by the previous Labour government); and, most significant,

-    the likelihood of a cyclical slowdown over the next couple of months.

 

 

 

The evidence for the slowdown was primarily the disappointing 0.3% increase in GDP in the first quarter – down from

 

0.7% in the fourth quarter. The FT (which blames everything on Britain’s decision to quit the EU) was quick to characterize this as “‘Brexit’ stagnation”.  Maybe, but there are signs of a pick up. Alt hough it is true that UK car sales

 

 

 

appear to have collapsed in April (in part because of fears about new rules on diesel and because of tax incre ases), it was also reported last week:

 

 

-    that Markit’s construction PMI improved in April from 52.2 to 53.1; and

 

-    consumer credit jumped a hefty 10% in March, suggesting growing confidence.

 

 

 

As a result, the downturn may not be severe enough to dent Mrs May’s electoral appeal. One can but hope.

 

 

 

As for European markets, it was generally a good week – even in the UK, notwithstanding the mud-slinging over ‘Brexit’.

 

In Germany, for instance, the Xetra Dax was up 3.2% the week before last – and was up another 2.2% last week to 12,717. As for the CAC 40 (which had been up 4.1% the previous week) , that closed up another 3.1% at 5,432. In the UK, the FTSE100 had been up 1.3% two weeks ago, and closed last Friday up another 1.3% at 7,297.

 

 

Meanwhile, bonds have been all over the place.  Week -on-week, the yield on the 10-year bund has risen from 0.34% to

 

0.42% - but the yield on the 10-year UK gilt has actually fallen from 1.17% to 1.12 %, suggesting that investors are betting on Mrs May rather than Jean-Claude Juncker.

 

 

As for Japan, it was another strong week – even though equity markets were closed on Wednesday and Thursday.  The Nikkei 225 had been up 3.1% the previous week, and closed last Friday up another 1.9% at 19,446. That wa s despite slightly disappointing PMIs for April – with the manufacturing PMI falling slightly from 52.8 to 52.7, and the services PMI dropping from 52.9 to 52.2. On the other hand, total vehicle sales were up 5.4% year -on-year in April, and the minutes of the latest MPC meeting were generally upbeat about the possibility of hitting the BoJ’s 2% inflation target.

 

 

There was more concern about China last week. As shown below, both the (official) NBS and (private) Caixin P MIs were slightly disappointing:

 

 

China: Purchasing Managers Indices (April)

 

 

Manufacturing

Services

NBS

51.2 (←51.8)

54.0 (←55.1)

Caixin

50.3 (←51.7)

51.2 (←52.1)

 

 

 

In addition, the PBoC and regulators have started to crack down on speculators, pushing short -term interest rates up and driving equities down. The Shanghai Composite is now off 5% over the l ast month and bond yields are at a two-year high. That is despite yet another increase in FX reserves, which now stand at US $3.03 trillion.

 

 

On top of that, there remain geopolitical uncertainties over relations with North K orea –which accused Beijing last week of

 

“insincerity and betrayal”, warning of “grave consequences”. The US may be used to that, but China is not.

 

 

 

As for the emerging markets more generally, two countries are giving particular concern:

 

 

 

- South Korea, where voters go to the polls tomorrow to elect a new President.  Thanks, in part to an offhand comment by President Trump, suggesting that he would like Korea to pay for the highly sophisticated Thaad missile shield that the US installed (and which became operative last week), the polls have swung in favour of the more left-wing candidate, Moon Jae-in. His platform involves ending North Korea’s isolation, and engaging politically and economically with Pyongyang – which is bound to set him at odds with Washington. His nearest rival, the more conservative Hong Joon-pyo, is polling just 17%. Despite this, it is worth noting that South Korean stocks are currently at a record high.

 

 

- Venezuela, where Maduro’s decision to convene a Special Assembly to draft a replacement Constitution for the one imposed by his predecessor, Hugo Chavez, 18 years ago is being seen for what it is: a coup d’etat intended to perpetuate the rule of the “thugocracy” around the President.  However, that is not the only problem

Venezuela faces. Among its unpaid creditors is Russia’s Rosneft – which holds as collateral a 50% stake in

 

Citgo, the PDVSA-owned chain of US gas stations.  That is likely to pose a serious dilemma for the US State

 

Department, which may have to decide whether it dislikes Venezuela/Maduro or Rus sia/Putin more.

 

 

 

Currencies:  Despite Friday’s unexpectedly strong US employment data, the dollar continued to drift lower against the euro last week, and is currently nudging against US $1.10/€. Note, however, that it has not broken through despite Macron’s victory – which had effectively been priced in. At the same time, the dollar has also weakened against sterling – though, again, so far the pound has not broken US $1.30/£ The dollar has, however, strengthened against the yen – which clearly lost some of its ‘safe haven’ appeal once it became clear that ‘Frexit’ was no longer on the cards.

 

 

 

The week before last, the dollar fell 1.8% against the euro, to finish at US $1.089/€. It also fell 1.6% against sterling, to US

 

$1.204/£, and 0.3% against the Swiss franc to SF0.954/US $. However, it strengthened 2.1% against the yen, to close at

 

Y111.47/US $.

 

 

 

Last week, through the close on Friday, the dollar wa s:

 

 

 

-     down another 0.8% against the euro, at US $1.099/€;

 

-     down 0.1% against sterling, at US $1.296/£;

 

-     up 1.0% against the yen, at Y112.6/US $; and

 

-     down 0.6% against the Swiss franc, at SF0.995/US $.

 

 

 

It was, however, up 1.6% against the Australian dollar, while it wa s flat against the Canadian dollar at CAN $1.37/US $.

 

 

 

In early trade today, what is striking is that the euro has actually weakened slightly, to US $1.0961, while sterling has continued to nudge higher, and is currently trading at US $1. 298. It is significant that the risk premium attached to sterling as a result of “Brexit” appears to be narrowing slightly. Indeed, Nomura is now predicting that the pound could firm to US

$1.37 by year-end.  As for the euro, it seemed certain to get a modest bounce on Macron’s anticipated victory – but most of that bounce had already occurred ahead of the vote, and it could be vulnerable as the Parliamentary elections approach.

 

 

Meanwhile, gold has continued to ease – despite the very real geopolitical problems around the world.  Two weeks ago,

 

spot gold fell 1.2% to close at US $1,266.45/oz.  Last week, it fell steadily, and is currently trading at just US $1,231 – down

 

2.8% for the week.

 

 

 

Energy:  As noted, both marker crudes came under enormous pressure last Thursday, with June WTI falling 4.9% to US

 

$45.49. /barrel and July Brent falling 4.8% to US $48.37. There ha s been a modest recovery since then, with WTI currently trading at US $46.43/barrel around mid-day and Brent at US $49.39. But that still leaves WTI (which fell 0.8% two weeks ago) down 5.7% for the week and Brent off 4.8 %.

 

 

The usual suspect when prices fall like this is the stock situation.  Globally, stocks are stil l unusually high.  However, last week at least, US crude stocks were down. According to the API, for instance, private sector crude stocks fell 4.15 million barrels in the latest week, while according to the EIA, total stocks were down 930,000 barrels.  While that was less than

 

 

 

expected, crude stocks are clearly not the reason. However, US product stocks, particularly of gasoline, are up – and that could be a driver, particularly since the EIA reported last week that US consumption of gasoline is down 2.7% year-on-year (presumably thanks to increased fuel efficiency).

 

 

Beyond stocks, the reasons being put forward for the latest price fall include:

 

 

 

-    a sudden reversal of speculative positions by hedge funds;

 

-    a “technical tantrum” caused when WTI broke its 200 -day moving average;

 

- the continuing increase in US shale oil production, with the Bake r-Hughes rig count now up for 16 straight weeks;

- increased production from Libya (which is not a party to the OPEC/non-OPEC production restraint agreement);

- the broader weakness of the commodity sector, which is being attributed to weaker demand from China; and, most intriguingly,

- reports that, despite the success of OPEC in cutting its production by around 1.4 million b/d, actual exports are down less than 1.0 million – presumably reflecting reduced domestic consumption.

 

 

Whatever, the current consensus  is that, unless OPEC and (presumably) Russia agree to extend the production restraint agreement beyond June, prices will continue  to weaken. The next OPEC mee ting is on May 25, but there is pressure to act sooner. (And, indeed, over the weekend, the Saudi Oil Minister appeared to be willing to consider a standstill until end -

2018.)

 

 

 

That said, maybe OPEC should just tough it out… It was also reported last week that a 200-basis point increase in US interest rates could more than eliminate the cost improvements made over the last few years by US tight oil producers – putting many of them out of work.

 

 

Banking and finance:  There have been several developments on the regulatory front, but the one that sticks out this

 

week is a warning from the EU’s Financial Services Commissioner, Valdis Dombrovskis,  about euro -denominated clearing. This is important  as an indicator of how the European Commission views fi nancial services more generally in a post-

‘Brexit’ world.

 

 

 

What concerns Dombrovskis is what happens to euro clearing after the UK leaves the EU. The clearing of euro - denominated derivatives is a multi-trillion-dollar business, and most of it (up to 70%) takes pl ace in London. He is apparently exploring three options:

 

 

-    granting the UK “regulatory equivalence” – which would permit clearing to continue as at present;

 

- insisting that, if clearing does take place in the UK, it will do so under EU regulatory authority – which will be imposed extra-territorially; and/or

-    forcing clearing houses physically to relocate inside the EU.

 

 

 

There is obviously strong support for the last option – particularly for the biggest exchanges (most of which are foreign- owned). However, there is also another problem: if a clearing house (or CCP) fail s, the potential cost of a bail-out would be enormous. Would the EU want to carry that risk – particularly when most of the business (even euro-denominated business) comes from outside the E U?

 

 

As for this week, the most important US economic  releases will be:

 

 

 

-    the CPI and PPI for April;

 

-    retail sales for April; and

 

-    the Michigan confidence index for May.

 

 

 

In the eurozone, markets will focus on industrial production for March, as well as on German factory orders and trade data. Here, in the UK, the BofE’s MPC will meet, but is most unlikely to tighten monetary policy so near to a general election.  However, its Inflation Report will be read closely.

 

 

In China, the key release will be trade data for April.

 

 

 

Finally, I was intrigued to read that Ruffer & Co – a medium sized UK investment manager with a terrific track record (not to mention a direct line to God through Lambeth Palace) – is buying way out-of-the-money contracts to protect against the possibility of a global market crash. There are lots of doom-and-gloom investors in the US, but Ruffer is a bit special. I would like to know more about its concerns.

 

 

 

Andrew Hilton

 

Please note that this report is only for member organisations an d clients of Strategy International Ltd, including The D Group and British Expertise International. Broader circulation is only permissible by agreement with the author. Please direct all queries to MT@strategyinternational.co.uk or to Rhiannon@economic-evaluation.com.


Government Australia Advisory Board

Simon Crean MP

John Brumby 

Kristina Keneally

Mark Vaile

Nick Greiner

Alexander Downer

Peter Charlton

Trevor Rowe

Warwick Smith

 

Bob Carr